Who We Are

The Office of Information and Communications Technology (OICT) enables a better, safer, more sustainable future through innovative technology. It is committed to ensuring colleagues all over the world have every tool necessary to succeed in their respective mandates.

Our goal is to make the world a better place.

Learn more

OSS4SDG Hackathon Winners

The Office of Information and Communications Technology and the European Commission Directorate-General for Informatics announced the five winners of the Get plugged into Education! hackathon, the first innovation event from the Open Source Software for Sustainable Development Goals (OSS4SDG) initiative, on 30 June.  ​

Learn more

The Restoring Hope challenge seeks socially innovative ideas that could help millions of people across the Arab region to reclaim hope in their societies, restore belief in a dignified and prosperous future, and revive their will to assume a role in shaping this future.

Learn more

Engage With Us

News Updates

01 July 2022

The Office of Information and Communications Technology (OICT) and the European Commission Directorate-General for Informatics (EC DG--DIGIT) announced the five winners of the Get plugged into Education! hackathon, the first innovation event from the Open Source Software for Sustainable Development Goals (OSS4SDG) initiative, on 30 June.  

07 June 2022

The Department of Operational Support (DOS) and the Office of Information and Communications Technology (OICT), in cooperation with the Government of the Republic of South Africa, will be hosting the Sixth Partnership for Technology in Peacekeeping International Symposium in the City of Tshwane (Pretoria), South Africa, from 21 to 24 June 2022. This event was originally planned for 2020 but was postponed due to COVID-19. This will be the first time the Symposium is held in Africa.

26 May 2022

On Wednesday 25 May, the Secretariat of the United Nations was informed that multiple dignitaries received unsolicited messages purporting to originate from UN senior management. These communications took the form of "Signal" messages and fraudulently stated that they were to inform the recipient that a senior management official was reaching out to them using their “personal number”.